Can Capsular Contracture Occur Twice?

Sep 5, 2011 by

Yes. Absolutely. The statistics show an increased rate of  capsular contracture following breast augmentation revision surgery.

But, just because capsular contracture occurred after one breast implant surgery, it does not mean it will occur again.

Let’s look at some data and information from leading implant manufacturing companies:

Mentor® Corporation provides the following information in their MemoryGel® implants, the information can be found here, please reference page 27-32 for re-operation information. From their product information:

  • Capsular contracture rate for primary breast augmentation patients after 3 years: 8.1%
  • Capsular contracture rate for re-operation for revision augmentation patients after 3 years: 18.9%
So, you see the bad news- 8.1% of patients had capsular contracture after the primary augmentation surgery and 18.9% of patients had capsular contracture after the re-operation. That is bad news as almost 2 in 10 patients that had a re-operation ended up with capsular contracture after the re-operation. The good news would be that 8 of 10 patients were capsular contracture free 3 years following the re-operation.
This is from Allergan®, the other major implant manufacturer in the USA. Taken from Directions for Use NATRELLE® Silicone-Filled Breast Implants pages 23-29. The  capsular contracture information:
  • Capsular contracture rate for primary breast augmentation patients after 7 years: 15.5%
  • Capsular contracture rate for re-operation for revision augmentation patients after 7 years: 20.4%

Remember, these numbers are over 7 years, much longer than above numbers that were 3 years. As you can see- more than 1 in 10 people will have  capsular contracture following the first breast augmentation and right at 2 in 10 people will have capsular contracture within 7 years following the re-operation.

The numbers show that a woman can have capsular contracture multiple times following a breast augmentation.

I want to stress that I am not attacking these implant manufacturers, their data was accepted by the USA FDA. I am attacking the types of implants used- smooth and textured shells- as these implants have always shown a higher rate of  capsular contracture following a primary breast augmentation surgery or a re-operation. With the rate of capsular contracture following re-operation continuing to increase, why isn’t the FDA looking for a solution? Like Polyurethane foam covered silicone gel implants that are used all around the world and have a documented rate of capsular contracture that is much lower than either smooth or textured implants.

Until  capsular contracture can be solved in both primary and revision augmentation, all *safe* breast implants should be considered- including Polyurethane foam.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *